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Infinite Diversity, Finite Combinations 1.1.9: We Can Forget It For You Wholesale

Infinite Diversity, Finite Combinations 1.1.9: We Can Forget It For You Wholesale

19 Oct, 2017

Let’s talk about memory, peace, psychiatry, equality, and the need to remain ourselves no matter how many people tell us we need to be something else.

TV REVIEW: The Flash S4E2 ‘Mixed Signals’ (Spoliers)

TV REVIEW: The Flash S4E2 ‘Mixed Signals’ (Spoliers)

18 Oct, 2017

‘Mixed Signals’ brought all the laughter and lightness that The Flash promised us this season, without skimping on the supervillains.

NYCC 17: Interviews with the Cast of Gotham

NYCC 17: Interviews with the Cast of Gotham

17 Oct, 2017

The cast and executive producer of Fox’s Gotham share secrets and preview the current season while at New York Comic Con this year.

COMIC REVIEW: PsychoKiller: The Doctor Will See You Now!

COMIC REVIEW: PsychoKiller: The Doctor Will See You Now!

17 Oct, 2017

Newly released by ‘The Godfather of British Comics’ Pat Mills, PsychoKiller is a collection of narratives which ran in 1991 from popular British Comic Toxic. Its trademark humour, violence and action are superbly crafted to appeal to a wide audience and it’s occult theme is perfect for Halloween!

COMIC REVIEW: Mr Higgins Comes Home

COMIC REVIEW: Mr Higgins Comes Home

16 Oct, 2017

Mike Mignola’s latest horror one-shot is a rather charming affair. Drawn by Warwick Johnson- Cadwell (Lovecraft Anthology 2, Sold State Tank Girl) and written by Mignola, Mr Higgins Comes Home plays with genre conventions in a nod to Hammer Horror from the 1970s.

TV REVIEW: Gotham S4E4 ‘The Demon’s Head’

TV REVIEW: Gotham S4E4 ‘The Demon’s Head’

15 Oct, 2017

“The Demon’s Head” was written by Gotham’s very own Ben McKenzie and featured some of the best storytelling on the show to date.

Doctor Who: The Long Way Round: Marco Polo – Part 1

Doctor Who: The Long Way Round: Marco Polo – Part 1

14 Oct, 2017

So this marks a slight departure in the format, although in what way is perhaps an interesting question. So far Doctor Who has largely ignored known figures and events. Instead they land smack in the middle of a mission for Marco Polo.

GSN PODCAST:Geek Syndicate – Episode 288 (International Comics Expo Special ‘State of UK Comics Panel’)

GSN PODCAST:Geek Syndicate – Episode 288 (International Comics Expo Special ‘State of UK Comics Panel’)

12 Oct, 2017

In an episode that was recorded at the International Comics Expo last month Dave and Barry are joined by a cross section of the UK comic industry. The panel discuss the future of the medium in the UK and ask those all important questions about the state of the comics nation.

Infinite Diversity, Finite Combinations 6.1.8: Second Contact

Infinite Diversity, Finite Combinations 6.1.8: Second Contact

12 Oct, 2017

Not, it turns out, forty-two minutes of Sid Meier’s masterpiece. At least a lizard gets punched, though.

GAME REVIEW: Necrosphere (PC)

GAME REVIEW: Necrosphere (PC)

12 Oct, 2017

Some gamers are just sadists. Maybe those folk would enjoy Necrosphere, a very challenging side-scrolling platformer. There is a “story” to Necrosphere: You are- or were- a cop who has died. You are now trying to find your way out of the afterlife, out of the Necrosphere and into a portal, back to the Normalsphere. The big twist of Necrosphere is that you only use two buttons: left and right. There is no jump button. This is where the challenge of Necrosphere comes in. Without the ability to jump, easily advancing is more difficult. To “jump” there are bubbles found around the area, and the only control you have is the timing of your bounce and fall. If my brain had a mouth, I think it would’ve vomited a dozen times from the nerves Necrosphere has caused. As you can see in the trailer, the way home is filled with fire and spikes. There is no health. If you die, you are taken back to the latest checkpoint. Luckily, the cats at Cat Nigiri are very generous with checkpoints, so you don’t have to travel 2 minutes to your furthest point, only to die again. Necrosphere is still too mean, even though they give you checkpoints so close to each other, and even though you can save at any point in the game. In the game, they say that this is not Hell, but Necrosphere feels that way sometimes. The world is mapped out into a crafty, interconnected maze, so you will often backtrack after you’ve unlocked areas, and you will find yourself being led back to certain points. This is the Metroidvania system of level design, which is popular with a lot of PC game developers. Why do we continue to get so many of these games with interconnected levels? Probably because it works in those games, and people cannot get enough. Using Metroidvania design works here was well. As much as I have been frustrated, the puzzle solver in me wants to know how I unlock parts of the world. This slideshow requires JavaScript.   I have played the game for only two hours, so I don’t know when I will get...